21.1 C
Dublin
Saturday, May 30, 2020
- Advertisement -

Government confirms course maintenance can continue

Must read

The hazard of playing under coronavirus rules

Golf under coronavirus restrictions is a welcomed change of pace from lockdown cabin fever but it's also raising interesting questions that could change the game over time

Form is temporary, class is permanent…. 

Watch enough sport and you’re sure to hear it said, but as with all great clichés, the foundations are based on truth

A chance meeting on a Dublin bus

It's hard to imagine something like this happening these days given people's obsession with screens. We might not be so quick to stare at our phone next time we travel

Brady shows his human side (and nearly his backside) to the world

As athletes go, Tom Brady is about as unrelatable as they come, with a net worth of around $200 million & married to a supermodel, but he was one of us on Sunday night

The Golfing Union of Ireland and Irish Ladies Golf Union have issued clubs around the country guidelines as to how they can continue to maintain their courses safely throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

On Monday, the Golf Course Superintendents Association of Ireland recommended that Irish Greenkeepers do not attend work, in compliance with HSE and government policy.

There was an immediate outcry from clubs and greenkeepers alike fearful of the impact of such drastic measures.

However, guidelines already sent to clubs around the country on Friday, March 27th from the GUI & ILGU recognised that golf course maintenance could be considered to be essential work that could not be done remotely, therefore permitting greenkeepers to continue working, provided they do so to the strict safety guidelines outlined below:

Working practices

The primary consideration must be the health and wellbeing of greenkeeping staff. All golf facilities should implement stringent measures to ensure staff members are not at risk. The amount of time that greenkeeping staff are at work should be kept to a minimum and be tailored to fit with the agreed essential maintenance programme.

Measures should include but are not limited to:

  • Focus on hygiene and social distancing
  • Ensure staff members work separately
  • Allocate individual machinery to one worker only
  • If multiple staff on site, then stagger working hours and break times
  • Limit or prohibit use of communal areas
  • Regularly disinfect any surface that is contacted e.g. door handles, fuel pumps, communal machinery
  • Ensure there is a robust lone working policy

Mowing

Greens should be mown according to the rate of growth to a maximum of three times per week. Dew removal should be considered on non-mowing days as required to prevent disease spread.

Tees and green surrounds should be mown according to the rate of growth to a maximum of once per week.

Fairways should be mown according to the rate of growth to a maximum of once per week.

Managed roughs and grass paths should be mown according to need to a maximum of once every two weeks (fortnightly). Only roughs considered to be in direct play should be mown allowing for naturalisation to areas largely out of play.

The height of cut adopted for all these areas is site specific but the elevation of the cutting height on fine turf areas is advised to minimise unnecessary stress on the turf. The aim of the above operations is to maintain uniformity, density, texture and health to allow surfaces to be quickly brought back to an appropriate playing standard once play resumes.

Irrigation and Nutrition

Irrigation and nutrition should be carried out as necessary but with the objectives of keeping the turf alive, maintaining a full sward and preventing turf thinning. Avoid excesses of either input which will only serve to promote unnecessary growth and necessitate more maintenance.

Machinery and Equipment Maintenance

This should be carried out as required to ensure that essential equipment is kept safe and operational.

Operations such as maintaining bunkers, penalty areas, wider practice facilities (other than greens and tees), aeration, top dressing and spraying are not considered essential at this time. However, it is conceivable that occasional spraying to control an acute pest, weed or disease problem may be considered essential at times and in some circumstances.

Updates

Given the fluidity of the current situation there may be a requirement to update and re-issue this guidance in respect of future government advice.

New Gear

Get to grips with Golf Pride online

With restrictions still widespread, Golfers can find the perfect golf grip digitally with the Golf Pride online Grip Selector tool, offering us access to the company's most extensive ever range

Free GPS App from Bushnell Golf gets a massive upgrade

Free to download for all Bushnell Golf product owners, the new App provides access to state-of-the-art graphics and technology designed to further enhance a golfer's experience on the course

TaylorMade unveil timely MyMG2 personalised wedges

New custom wedge programme offers thousands of combinations to personalise the company’s latest wedge offerings

Golf needs its Putt Buddy now more than ever

An Irish company, run by Irish golfers have enlisted the help of Irish manufacturers to produce a stainless steel product that allows the ball to be removed from the hole without touching the flagstick

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest News

East of Ireland Championship cancelled for only second time in 80 years

Darren Clarke is the only Irish Major champion who posted an East of Ireland victory on his amateur golfing CV en route to becoming a world renowned figure in the game

Pelley says McIlroy’s Ryder Cup Stance Not ‘Unhelpful’

"He's so intelligent, he's so bright, and I love the way he speaks his mind. I've got no problem with that at all, and it's fantastic for our game"

Bright future in wait for Byron Nelson award winner Murphy

John Murphy claimed the prestigious Byron Nelson Award on Thursday and can now look forward to an invite to next May's AT&T amongst the stars of the PGA Tour

Irish Open could have its day in the 2020 sunshine yet

"It is hugely important to us. So much so that we have three or four date options for it.  We could have announced it today but it wouldn't have been 100 percent and I didn't feel comfortable"

The hazard of playing under coronavirus rules

Golf under coronavirus restrictions is a welcomed change of pace from lockdown cabin fever but it's also raising interesting questions that could change the game over time